Hello Panasonic Lumix DMC-G2.

Meet G2, the newest hardware member of the Bowen family. She is a sleek and very sexy, light micro four thirds digital camera with interchangeable lens from Panasonic. She is a D-SLR and a compact camera rolled into one so you get the best of both worlds.

It wasn’t by chance that I was in Comet looking at her. After my Panasonic DMC-TZ7 stopped working at Glastonbury (after I spilt beer on it…. it was hot and he looked thirsty ūüėČ ), I’ve spent the last few weeks looking for a replacement and have been reading all the review sites, comparing notes, adding up the pros and cons against the various camera models and in the end decided that the G2 was going to be our next “proper” camera. We’ve only ever had fixed lense or point and shoot cameras.

Here is what drew me to this camera:

  • 12 megapixel.
  • Light weight, small, not too bulky.
  • Small light weight lenses and with the right adapter one can use a number of other four third lenses.
  • Large 3″ screen that can pull out and swivel 270 degrees.
  • The screen is touch screen. This might be a gimmick but I’ll comment further once I have used it a bit more.
  • Electronic View Finder with over a million pixels making it very clear to see what is going on.
  • Pop-up flash and external flash support.
  • Support for the new SD cards (SDXC).
  • Record HD Video.
  • It has an iA button that when pushed turns the camera into the perfect photographic machine useful for those not wanting to use all he manual features.
  • There are many more features which you can check out on the Panasonic specifications page.

I have two lenses so far ;-), the 14-42mm that came with the camera and a 44-200mm lense that I bought for landscape shooting. So far I have only used the 14-42mm and starting to understand what is best taken with this lense.

I have created an album in my gallery and named it Panasonic Lumix DMC-G2 and will be adding some of my best photos in due course. It is definitely going to take a while to learn all the functions. There is so much on the camera that is different to the basic point and shoot.

Old lock on the shed door with a bit of reflection.

Focusing on the Lavendar flowers in the front.

Focusing on the flowers behind the main Lavendar flower.